Posts tagged ‘america’s next top model’

Modeling and Acting in Japan: A Tough Sell

It seems like western actors and models are constantly making Japanese commercials or snagging the best Japanese modeling jobs. The other day I saw a post on Craig’s List seeking Caucasian and Caucasian/Asian mixed models, 18-24 years old, to live and work in Japan. On the surface it sounded cushy and exciting, especially because the poster claims to provide round trip airline tickets, housing, a minimum base salary of ¥ 200,000 per month (plus whatever you make modeling) and a six to ten month contract.

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However, according to the Japan-based Arts C Models agency, “the hey-day for foreign models occurred from the mid 80’s to very early 90’s” when “the Japanese fascination with the west was at its peak.” Perhaps gaijins are not in such high demand right now after all. Actually booking jobs as a foreigner (even as a no-line extra), isn’t easy, as the blogger at Gaijin Tonic recently attested:

I signed up with an agency hoping to get some work as an extra. I thought it would be a laugh to be on TV in Japan, just once or twice, the token white face in the crowd. I failed even at that humble goal! Someone pointed out to me that extras are supposed to be unobtrusive and inconspicuous, and that as a towering 6’5″ blond oaf, I’d be the worst extra ever.

Even petite, slender model Elyse Sewell, a fan favorite from the inaugural season of America’s Next Top Model who went on to have a successful career in Hong Kong, had difficulty conquering the Japanese market.

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Check out this 2004 exchange with her Japanese modeling agents, excerpted from her LiveJournal:

Kumi: Since the last time you here [in February], your who-o-ole image completely change.
Elyse: Oh, um, what do you mean, Kumi? [Assuming they’re about to tell me I look old or have ugly hair]
Kumi: Last time you here, you ve-e-ery kawai. Very, very thin.
Elyse: Have I put on weight?

Akemi makes the universal sign for “fat”: cheeks puffed out, hands gripping an imaginary Santa paunch.

Kumi: Yes, you put on kilos. Your whole body change. You got a big belly, big face…
Akemi: Don’t eat rice! Do exercises.
Kumi: Do walking.

Hmm, maybe if I walked more I could get a sweet modeling gig in Japan!

 

Sarah S.

—————————————————————————
Thinking of doing business in Japan? We can make it easy for you!
JPBizDirect, a Los Angeles based company, provides practical solutions for U.S. – Japan business projects. Our experienced Japanese staff will support all phases of your business project to seize business opportunities and turn your vision into a reality. >> Learn more
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February 14, 2008 at 10:07 am 3 comments

This videogame teaches you what?!

Most of the time I think it’s great when a male-dominated industry wises up to the marketplace and decides to include women, but I’m not so sure about Nintendo DS’s latest Japanese videogames. The popular, ubiquitous handheld device has cards for every game under the sun: action, sports, first-person shooter, and, in the U.S., it includes classic titles like Metroid, Super Mario and Legend of Zelda.

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Now the Japanese company is branching out into “women’s titles” like “My Happy Manner Book,” and “DS Therapy” (hmmm). These so-called games are actually self-improvement exercises with quizzes and tests on par with questions you see in grocery store magazines, and I doubt they’ll be making their way stateside anytime soon.

I think the best title is (deep breath) “Female Power Emergency Up! DS.” You need to see it to believe it. Brought to us by, yes, a women’s weekly fashion magazine (called Anan), FPEU! (for short) is a videogame that encourages its players to improve themselves in the areas of beauty, romance, exercise and make-up application, and then tests you on your knowledge of diets and even fortune-telling.

These topics (well, maybe not fortune telling) certainly constitute an emergency if you’re competing on America’s Next Top Model, but for the rest of us the game might serve to point out inadequacies we didn’t know we had. Perhaps the target audience skews to junior high or high school age (after all, what 17 year old really reads Seventeen magazine?) with FPEU serving as a pocket-sized big sister giving advice, but this is one life coach I’ll probably skip!

Sarah S.

—————————————————————————
Thinking of doing business in Japan? We can make it easy for you!
JPBizDirect, a Los Angeles based company, provides practical solutions for U.S. – Japan business projects. Our experienced Japanese staff will support all phases of your business project to seize business opportunities and turn your vision into a reality. >> Learn more
—————————————————————————

 

October 25, 2007 at 7:34 am 1 comment


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